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STEM Science Fair Projects Help Students Prepare for Real-Life Careers

Science fair projects are a great way for students to test out their interest and aptitude for a career in STEM (science-technology-engineering-math). But they shouldn’t choose just any old topic. Try to focus on projects with real-world applications that will give them some experience in a good-paying job field, like engineering. With planning and hard work, the right science fair project might bump up a student’s chances for a scholarship or Continue reading

Women in Science and Engineering

Women in Science and Engineering: Tunable Laser Inventor Mary Spaeth

One of the most accomplished engineers I have had the privilege of interviewing was Mary L. Spaeth, a specialist in the field of laser optics.

Spaeth was a pioneer who discovered the world’s first “tunable” laser.

While researching ruby lasers at Hughes Aircraft Corp., Spaeth “came to believe that dyes would make excellent lasers.” Dyes are strongly colored chemicals that can be used to add color to a material, such as hair or cloth.

The year was 1966, only six years after the first laser was invented. Continue reading

E is for Engineering – The Best STEM Careers

2013 First Lego League Global Innovation Award winners, the NeXT GEN Team

The NeXT GEN Team won the 2013 FIRST Lego League Global Innovation Award for developing a tool to help seniors pick up small objects, such as pills, using robotic technology.

As someone with a degree in engineering, I’ve noticed a peculiar fact. In the world of STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Math) engineering careers appear to be the ugly ducklings of the group.

There’s a lot of talk about teaching kids to code, which falls under math, computer science and technology. There’s also a huge emphasis in the media on biotech, space science, and environmental science.

But in my opinion, the lowly engineer gets short shrift. Continue reading

Women in the Lead: Smart Cities

Women in Science and EngineeringBy Holly B. Martin

Cities large and small are buying in to the Smart Cities movement, addressing the challenges of increasing urbanization using data and technology. Women in particular are prominently positioned as leaders in the movement, seeking to create more livable, efficient and sustainable cities through their technical, business and civic know-how.

As more and more people flood into cities worldwide, local governments are being called upon to help provide more services such as healthcare, economic development, infrastructure and safety to their burgeoning populations.

At the same time, the state of technology multiplies exponentially the amount of data being collected—as well as the possibilities of what can be done with this data. Continue reading